Without Knowledge of God There is No Knowledge of Self

It is certain that man never achieves a clear knowledge of himself unless he has first looked upon God’s face, and then descends from contemplating him to scrutinize himself. For we always seem to ourselves righteous and upright and wise and holy—this pride is innate …

The Confessions of St. Augustine; Book 13: Chapters 34-38

CHAPTER XXXIV—HE BRIEFLY REPEATS THE ALLEGORICAL INTERPRETATION OF GENESIS (CHAPTER 1), AND CONFESSES THAT WE SEE IT BY THE DIVINE SPIRIT. We have also examined what Thou willedst to be shadowed forth, whether by the creation, or the relation of things in such an order. …

The Confessions of St. Augustine; Book 13: Chapters 31-33

CHAPTER XXXI—WE DO NOT SEE “THAT IT WAS GOOD,” BUT THROUGH THE SPIRIT OF GOD, WHICH IS IN US. But they who by Thy Spirit see these things, Thou seest in them. Therefore when they see that these things are good, Thou seest that they …

The Confessions of St. Augustine; Book 13: Chapters 28-30

CHAPTER XXVIII—HE PROCEEDS TO THE LAST VERSE, “ALL THINGS ARE VERY GOOD,”—THAT IS, THE WORK BEING ALTOGETHER GOOD. And Thou, O God, sawest every thing that Thou hadst made, and, behold, it was very good. Yea we also see the same, and behold, all things …

The Confessions of St. Augustine; Book 13: Chapters 25-27

CHAPTER XXV—HE EXPLAINS THE FRUITS OF THE EARTH (VER. 29) OF WORKS OF MERCY. I would also say, O Lord my God, what the following Scripture minds me of; yea, I will say, and not fear. For I will say the truth, Thyself inspiring me …